Welcome to Cult TV

Cineology ® presents the official CULT TV ® website.  

Join us for the latest on the best in extraordinary fictional television and film from the past, present and future, and analysis on its cultural impacts.

Find out about the amazing facts in fiction, and discover the truth about what's really going on in the World around us...

blankety1.jpg
×

Warning

JUser: :_load: Unable to load user with ID: 64
Friday, 22 February 2008 08:11

Star Trek: The Next Generation

Catching lightning in a bottle a second time ...

 

USA - 1987-94 - 178 episodes (60 mins) - colour

Eighteen years on from the demise of the original Star Trek, after the aborted Star Trek: Phase 2 painfully metamorphosed into the series of movies starring the original cast, a new, recognisable series was reborn with Star Trek: The Next Generation.

Set 78 years after the original mission, with a new Enterprise and a new crew boldly going where no one had gone before, Star Trek: The Next Generation was still a hard sell. In America, with no network prepared to commit to more than a pilot and thirteen episodes, the show was sold straight into syndication. Finally on screen, it then had to overcome legions of die-hard fans of the original Star Trek who shared a common belief that a show without Kirk or Spock would never work, and the first year of episodes did little to alter that view, keeping too close to the mythos dictated by creator Gene Roddenberry, with stories reminiscent of, or directly recycled from, the original show.

It took until its third year for The Next Generation to find itself, all the while staying true to the Star Trek ethos, by which time the characters and universe they inhabited was properly defined, and worthy adversaries like John de Lancie's mischievous Q, and the relentless Borg, were established. By the end of its seven year run, overcoming all the odds stacked against it, The Next Generation even succeeded in superseding the original show as the flagship Star Trek series in the eyes of its increasingly loyal fanbase.


REGULAR CAST
Patrick Stewart as Jean-Luc Picard
Jonathan Frakes as William Riker
Brent Spiner as Data
LeVar Burton as Geordi LaForge
Gates McFadden as Beverly Crusher
Marina Sirtis as Deanna Troi
Michael Dorn as Worf
Wil Wheaton as Wesley Crusher
Denise Crosby as Tasha Yar
Diana Muldaur as Katherine Pulaski

 

 

Posted in Series Formats
Friday, 22 February 2008 07:54

Lost In Space

Played for drama in monochrome, for laughs in colour ...

 

USA - 1965-68 - 83 episodes (60 mins) - B&W/colour

With the space race between the Americans and the Russians reaching fever pitch, producer Irwin Allen looked to the stars for his follow up to the successful Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea. A furturistic reworking of "The Swiss Family Robinson", Lost in Space charted the adventures of the Robinson family, selected to pilot the Jupiter 2 spacecraft from an overpopulated Earth to the new world of Alpha Centauri. When the ship is sabotaged by an enemy agent who has been trapped onboard, the family find themselves marooned on an unfamiliar world, deep in uncharted space. Helped by their sophisticated robot, and hindered by the back-sliding Doctor Smith (Jonathan Harris), the crew set about exploring their strange new home.

After a successful first season, the show found itself up against Batman in the schedules, and thus Irwin Allen altered the original concept to emulate the opposition's format, taking Lost in Space from a suspenseful action adventure to camp comedy, moving away from focusing on the family as a whole to concentrate on the mismatched, comedic relationship between Doctor Smith, Will Robinson (Billy Mumy) and the Robot. For the third year, with the arrival of Star Trek, the once land-locked Jupiter 2 was again able to travel to new worlds, allowing the Robinson family to escape their planet and venture out amongst the stars once again.

The most successful of Irwin Allen's quartet of science fiction series, the show's demise came not from declining ratings but Allen's unwillingness to accept budget cuts for a fourth year, leaving the Robinson's lost in space for good.

 

REGULAR CAST
Guy Williams as Professor John Robinson
June Lockhart as Doctor Maureen Robinson
Mark Goddard as Major Don West
Marta Kristen as Judy Robinson
Angela Cartwright as Penny Robinson
Billy Mumy as Will Robinson
Jonathan Harris as Doctor Zachary Smith
Dick Tufeld as the voice of the Robot

Posted in Series Formats
denizli escort denizli escort